THE SPERM TRACT AND THE PRODUCTION OF SEMEN

From its site of production in the testes, the sperm must travel through the sperm tract to reach the outside of the body. As it does so, the various components that make up the seminal fluid are added to the sperm. The sperm tract, illustrated in figure 3.7, consists of a number of ducts including the epididymis, the vas deferens, the ejaculatory duct, and the urethra. In addition, a number of glands that secrete various fluids join the sperm tract through a series of small ducts.

After being produced in the seminiferous tubules, the sperm are stored in the epididymis, which is a highly coiled, interconnected network of seminiferous tubules lying in the upper part of the testes. As the sperm mature in the epididymis, they become capable of movement as the neck of each sperm becomes flexible.

The vas deferens carries the sperm from the epididymis to the ejacu-latory duct. At this point, the ducts of the seminal vesicles join the sperm tract and provide a viscous, alkaline secretion containing fructose and prostaglandins. The fructose, a sugar, is a source of energy for the sperm; the prostaglandins stimulate uterine contractions and help the sperm move to the female's fallopian tubes where fertilization takes place. The prostate gland surrounds the ejaculatory duct at the place where it becomes the urethra. It secretes a milky fluid that aids in sperm motility. The fluid contains, among other things, a large concentration of bicarbonate ions that gives the semen its alkaline pH. The alkaline nature of the seminal vesicle fluid and the prostate gland fluid reduces the acidity present in the urinary system, which is joined to the sperm tract at the urethra. This is particularly important since sperm motility is adversely affected by an acidic environment. Finally, the bulbourethral glands (Cowper's glands) secrete a mucuslike substance that provides lubrication for the urethra.

The secretions just described are called seminal fluid, and the combination of sperm and seminal fluid is called semen. Since there frequently is confusion as to the distinction between sperm and semen, it is worthwhile to point out that while sperm are under the careful hormonal control previously described, the seminal fluid is produced by the body as needed and is not affected by hormonal levels. Also important is the fact that the semen contains an antibiotic substance called seminalplasmin. Were it not for seminalplasmin, seminal bacteria would almost always infect women's vaginas, making sexual intercourse a routine health hazard.

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THE BREAST CANCER PREVENTION DIET: CONSUMER'S GUIDE TO SUPPLEMENTS


THE BREAST CANCER PREVENTION DIET: CONSUMER'S GUIDE TO SUPPLEMENTS

For those who cannot or will not eat fish or for those concerned about the heavy metals and pesticides contained in fish, supplements are the only way to go. For women at high risk of breast cancer, this is the fastest, most effective way of changing breast fat. However, most top researchers in the field feel that women should take large amounts of fish oil for significant periods only under the confines of a research study or careful clinical observation.

Contaminants

Fish oils are so highly processed that it would probably be impossible to find any measurable amounts of contaminants, say experts assembled by the Food and Nutrition Board of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences. Heavy metals don't accumulate in fish oil because the processing techniques take it out. Steam-stripping removes pesticides, PCBs, and heavy metals. Fish oils that taste very "fishy" may not be steam-stripped. Look for "molecularly distilled" fish oils for the cleanest product.

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